Five Tips to Improve Your Heart Health

Photo of doctor using stethoscope on patient
February 21, 2020 | Tags: Heart health Wellness

Your heart is made up of muscle, blood vessels and valves that work together to pump blood to all areas of your body. Two common risk factors for your heart health are high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Both of these conditions can cause damage to your heart, which can lead to serious health issues like a heart attack or stroke. So how can you combat heart disease? See the tips below to work on creating a healthier you.

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Get physical

Living an active lifestyle is a key component to heart health. Staying active helps you maintain a healthy weight, which aids in the prevention of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol. Physical activity also improves blood flow throughout the body and supports your immune system. By aiming for 30 to 60 minutes of activity a day, you can easily reduce your chances of heart disease.

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Fuel your body

Another way to prevent heart disease and manage your weight is by eating a heart-healthy diet. Include plenty of fruits, vegetables, beans/legumes, whole grains, low sodium foods and low-fat dairy products in your diet. These foods provide vitamins and minerals to your body, while foods that contain high amounts of saturated fats, trans fats, sugar and salt put you at risk of developing clogged arteries that can lead to a heart attack.

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Know your numbers

The only way to know for sure if you are at risk for heart disease is by getting regular health screenings. Tests that can indicate risk of heart disease include blood pressure screenings, type 2 diabetes screenings or a lipid panel. By knowing your numbers, you can take the first step to improving your overall health.

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Say no to nicotine

Nicotine increases your blood pressure and contributes to the hardening of the artery walls, increasing your risk for heart attacks. Cigarette smoke specifically limits the amount of oxygen in your blood, therefore causing your heart to work even harder to supply enough oxygen to the body. Even if you aren’t a smoker, be sure to steer clear of secondhand smoke.

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Don't sweat the small stuff

Constant stress may increase your tendency to turn to harmful behaviors that raise your blood pressure such as heavy eating, drinking alcohol or smoking. If you experience stress for long periods of time, talk to your doctor about stress management and seek out healthy alternatives to these behaviors.

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Sources: Mayo Clinic, American Heart Association, Centers for Disease Control, American Medical Association

The material provided is for your information only. It does not take the place of your doctor’s advice, diagnosis or treatment. You should make decisions about your care with your doctor. What is covered by your health insurance will be based on your specific benefit plan.